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Seminars, events & talks

Wednesday, 11th November, 2015, 12:00

"Uncovering disease mechanisms through network biology in the era of next generation sequencing"

Characterizing the behavior of disease genes in the context of biological networks has the potential to shed light on disease mechanisms, and produce new candidate disease genes and therapeutic targets. Previous studies addressing the network properties of disease genes have produced seemingly contradictory results. We have explored the causes of these seeming discrepancies and assessed the relationship between disease genes' network roles and their tolerance to deleterious germline variants in human populations leveraging on: different interactome resources, a comprehensive catalog of disease genes and exome variation data. We found that the most salient network features of disease genes are driven by cancer genes and that genes related to different types of diseases play network roles whose centrality is inversely correlated to their tolerance to likely deleterious germline mutations. This proved to be a network multiscale signature, including global, mesoscopic and local network centrality features. Cancer driver genes, the most sensitive to deleterious variants, occupy the most central positions, followed by dominant disease genes and then by recessive disease genes, which are tolerant to variants and isolated within their network modules.

Speaker: JANET PIÑERO Biomedical Informatics, GRIB

Room Aula room 473.10 (4th floor)



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